Monthly Archives: September 2009

Playlists for Yoga Practices

om lotusCalling fellow yogis, yoga teachers and yoga practitioners!

I’ve been playing music before and after my yoga classes and I’m finding that it does wonderful things for getting everyone on a similar energetic page before starting/closing the class.

However, I’ve been playing the same music now for a few months and I’m starting to get tired of it.

If you like music before, during or after class, what kind do you like?

Any and all suggestions are welcome, from Krishna Das to Beyonce.

Restart

Frog (verb): to unknit, rip back, unravel, unwind or undo.  Usually accompanied by tears, chocolate and alcohol, amounts depending on the severity of the situation.

Ene’s scarf is frogged.  All the way back to the cast on.  I recast on all 375 stitches and knit back across the first row.

Why put myself through this pain and suffering?  Here’s what the lace border should have looked like:

correct border

correct border

This is what it looked like in too many other places, including the center point of the scarf:

ugh

ugh

So I’m back at the beginning and I will be paying MUCH closer attention to my stitches.

nascent stages ... again

nascent stages ... again

Dreams of a Yogi-Librarian

daydream5This article from Slate’s affiliate Double X on making a living as a yoga teacher got me thinking (and daydreaming) about teaching yoga full time, owning my own studio, and musing on my current career as a librarian.

In my latest daydream, I (and perhaps a friend) own a chic yoga studio where we and our band of fabulous yoga teachers lead students through classes that combine a great work out with empowering and inspiring teaching, and also provide space to breathe and relax.

Then I wake up.

Luckily, I have a solid career as a librarian that allows me to find my creative and teaching outlet as a part-time yoga instructor.

It seems that yoga teachers are suffering the same market-glut as librarians.  Suddenly, there are more of us than there are jobs, though at the present moment in the economy, that’s the case with every job.

As librarians, many of us in our 20′s and 30′s have been told that it’s a great time to be a librarian since all the good jobs will be opening up as people retire.  The “graying” of our chosen profession will lead us young ‘uns to a holy land of employment with benefits and meaningful and valuable work.

And then I wake up.

Again, being one of the lucky ones I don’t have to worry so much about my job, rent and meeting student loan payments (damn you Sallie Mae!)  I feel fortunate to have a job, even though it’s not really what I want to be doing with in my profession.  That’s how and why I found yoga — another lucky happenstance.  I needed an outlet for activity, creativity and teaching.  If there’s one thing I lack in my current job, it’s an outlet for connecting with students. What I have now works for me, but I wonder about others out there.  Others who are following their daydreams to reality.  If the Double X article is any representation, it’s a long hard road.

Gimmick or Godsend?

Huffington Post has a fun article looking at the various props, toys and what not associated with yoga.  The responses of people voting on each item with a 1 through 10 scale, 1 being total marketing ploy and 10 being an absolute essential.

A couple of the items made me laugh because they truly are ridiculous.  The yoga sandals and the weird looking purple foam bolster are just too silly to contemplate.

I also had a good chuckle when the posted the Savasana Wrap from Lululemon.  Despite the crazy price tag, I have it on my Christmas wish list.  I’ve tried it on and while I certainly wouldn’t drag it to yoga class  (a blanket? in a 95 degree studio??) I would wear it as the very cute jacket it’s meant to be.  Let this be a lesson for Lulu — get too clever and it’ll come back and bite you.

The comments are funny as is the feedback from people who practice or teach yoga.  (Shout out to the commenter who pointed out that neti pots are ancient Ayurvedic science and not a new fad.)

My yoga essentials are my el cheapo $12 mat purchased five years ago from a local grocery store and my Yogitoes for when I practice in a heated studio.   I’ve been considering a travel mat, but that’s still in a nascent stage.

What about you?  What do you find totally gimmicky?  What’s necessary for your yoga practice?

I wonder what Ogden would say about this? (Mmmm, goji berries.)

Knitting Update

Last December I cast on for Ene’s Scarf in a luscious sock-weight yarn in deep burgundy and black.  I’ve been slowly picking away at it as my schedule hasn’t allowed a lot of quality knitting time.

I haven’t touched the shawl in a good couple months.  The last time I looked at it I realized I had made some pretty hideous mistakes at the beginning.  We’re not talking a couple missed yarn overs, but some massive, pattern-altering mistakes.

I’ve only completed chart 1 and 2 which make up the border of the shawl, so in the grand scheme of things, not that much.

I know what needs to be done … frogging lace is so heartbreaking.

::sigh::

Consolations and words of knitterly wisdom are welcome.

What I Read – August 2009

This was a great month for reading and a week’s vacation in Maine helped create some quality downtime to really get involved in some great books.

Links take you to my reviews on Goodreads.com and the * marks books that I highly recommend/enjoyed.

*In Too Deep, Portia Da Costa

Au Revoir to All That: Food, Wine, and the end of France, Michael Steinberger

*In The Bleak Midwinter, Julia Spencer-Fleming

*Lord of Scoundrels, Loretta Chase

A Fountain Filled with Blood, Julia Spencer-Fleming

*Out of the Deep I Cry, Julia Spencer-Fleming

One Thousand White Women, Jim Fergus

*We Took to the Woods, Louise Dickinson Rich

All Mortal Flesh, Julia Spencer-Fleming

*To Darkness and to Death, Julia Spencer Fleming

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, Richard W. Wrangham

How about you?  What did you read this summer that you really liked?